SCHOTT solutions no. 2/2010 > short stories

Photo: SCHOTT/A. Sell

Architecture, Glass and Solar Energy

The home of the future will generate some of its own power. This vision has already become reality at SCHOTT Solar’s new headquarters in Mainz, Germany. A total of 82 semi-transparent SCHOTT ASI® Thru solar modules integrated into the semicircular glass façade generate power while providing shade. In the foyer, anti-reflective Amiran® glass, blue-tinted Imera® glass and fire-rated Pyran® glass provide excellent views while adding aesthetic appeal and maximizing safety. <|
Photo: SCHOTT/M. Plank

Like a Rainbow

Narima® brightens up the gaming company Novomatic’s group headquarters
150 square meters of color effect glass create an unusual atmosphere. Novomatic, one of the largest casino operators and manufacturers of gaming machines, had a large back wall paneled with glass in the entrance to its group headquarters in Gumpoldskirchen, south of Vienna, Austria. The rainbow effect created by Narima® is achieved by combining highly refractive and low refractive coatings. Ultra-thin, primarily metal oxide coatings are applied to sheets of glass via a dipping process. The glass is available in blue/gold, as at Novomatic, as well as in blue/green, green, yellow, orange and light green. <|
Photo: SCHOTT/H. Groh

First Open, then Discreet

Magira™ RestrictView allows an unrestricted view through one pane only
Magira™ RestrictView is a quick-change artist. If the viewer looks through one pane, it remains transparent. Two superimposed panes of the specialized glass, however, are not transparent and look black. The composite safety glass achieves this by combining two highly anti-reflective Amiran® glasses with a PVB film and a special interim coating. You can, for example, see the corridor through the glass door of your office, but cannot look through other glass doors into the rooms opposite. Magira™ RestrictView is therefore especially suited for use in hospitals, hotels or security areas, where openness and discretion are both needed. <|
Photo: SCHOTT/T. Hauser

Sights set on the Japanese Pharma Market

SCHOTT and Naigai Establish Joint Venture
To expand its position in the second largest pharmaceuticals market in the world, SCHOTT has established a joint venture with Naigai Glass Industry Co. to manufacture pharmaceutical packaging in Japan. The new company SCHOTT NAIGAI K.K. in Osaka will produce high-quality vials primarily from SCHOTT Fiolax® specialized glass tubing for the Japanese pharma industry. SCHOTT has an 80 percent stake in the joint venture. Naigai is contributing its current vial production and SCHOTT its highly advanced automatic inspection system. <|
Photo: SCHOTT/L. Phelps

Cool Gaze, Hot View

SCHOTT produces Zerodur® mirror substrate for world’s largest solar telescope ATST
In 2018, the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST), the largest solar telescope in the world, will beginn facing its astronomical eye from Hawaii on to the blazing sun. To obtain ultra-sharp pictures, a 76 millimeter thin, concave blank of Zerodur® glass-ceramic was used as the primary mirror substrate. It can be ­easily adjusted by actuators on the reverse side and cooled down to the ambient temperature, thus preventing image distortion. The decision to use SCHOTT material means that the largest, most up-to-date solar observatories in the world are now all fitted with Zerodur® mirror substrates. <|
Photo: SCHOTT

Desertec Benefits From New Technologies

SCHOTT Solar presents new receiver concepts at the initiative’s annual conference
SCHOTT Solar is among the technological driving forces of the Desertec Project, which aims to generate solar energy in the deserts of Northern Africa, Europe and the Middle East. At the first annual conference of the associated industrial initiative in Barcelona, the company presented highly efficient receiver technologies for use in solar power plants. They are key for further cost reductions and contribute to the marketability of this type of electricity production. The receiver forms the core component of a parabolic trough power plant; it collects sunlight and converts it into heat. Current systems use thermal oil as the heat transfer fluid. SCHOTT Solar presented concepts suitable for alternative heat transfer media, which will enable operation at higher temperatures, as well as new receivers for larger collector designs. These developments will enhance the efficiency of the entire power plant – prototypes have already been used in field tests. <|
Photo: SCHOTT

Seizing a Historic Chance

SCHOTT reflects recent history
October 3, 2010 was a significant day – not only for Germany, which celebrated 20 years of reunification. For SCHOTT, too, this was a historical milestone. After the Second World War the company was divided between East and West Germany. German Reunification offered an opportunity to bring the two parts back together. In 1991/95 SCHOTT took over the shares in its former head office in Jena and turned the GDR-era “publically owned enterprise” into a modern production site with a present workforce of more than 1,000. “Today we can look back proudly on the successful reunification at SCHOTT,” said Prof. Dr.-Ing. Udo Ungeheuer, Chairman of the Board of Management of SCHOTT AG, on the “Day of German Unity”. <|
Photo: starfacestudios.de

BME Innovation Award 2010

European prize goes to SCHOTT
SCHOTT received the 2010 BME Innovation Award from the German Federal Association for Materials Management, Purchasing, and Logistics (BME) for its project “Change Management and Safeguarding Processes on Spending with the help of a Comprehensive eProcurement Strategy”. In its unanimous jury decision, the BME gave special recognition to the change management process associated with this approach. SCHOTT implemented it with financially measurable success in a gradual and consistent manner, and it can be used in other industries. Stephan Schaller, Vice Chairman of the Board of Management of SCHOTT AG (left), and Michael E. Glaninger, Director of Global Purchasing eProcurement, accepted the award. <|